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Raptor Ramble Nature Walk

Upcoming Guided Nature Walk

Raptor Ramble

What: Raptor Ramble

When: Saturday September 5th 2015 from 8:00AM until 10:00AM

Where: Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Meet us in the driveway near 1st street and PCH.  You may park in the driveway.  

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will stroll through heritage coastal sage scrub and historic dredge spoils, while looking for raptors (birds of prey) and a number of other species that nest in the area. As we pass the salt flats we may see tiger beetles and coyote tracks before hiking up to the Heron Pointe Cultural trail to discuss how tidal circulation shapes our local wetlands. Our walk leaders will share their knowledge and passion for the wildlife of the wetlands as we continue along the cultural trail and discuss the native peoples of the area, the history of the Heron Pointe Development and look for wildlife like the endangered Belding’s Savannah Sparrow.

Download a flyer

For more information or to RSVP email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

The Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy works to restore and preserve the few remaining wetland acres in Huntington Beach.
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust aims to purchase and preserve the remaining open space of the Bolsa Chica, one of the last remaining wetland ecosystems in Southern California.

We love South Bay Wildlife Rehab
Rehabilitating wildlife throughout Southern California

Coyotes. Back in the news again. Let's be smart about them, OK?

coyotes are back
 

There has been a rash of coyote sightings, mostly in the neighborhoods around El Dorado Park. The reason for this increased coyote activity is unclear. Some say it's the drought; others say it's the easy availability of things coyotes like to eat, like food out of uncovered trash cans, vermin, tree fruit that lies on the ground and yes, free-roaming pets.   I have said it before and I will say it again.  I love my cat.  I love my dog.  I would be heartbroken if anything happened to them, and I consider it my responsibility to keep them safe.

The way to learn how to keep your cat or dog safe from coyotes is to learn about coyotes and how to keep them out of your neighborhood.  It's really the only thing that works.  I know some people want to trap and kill coyotes but, while I understand those people are frustrated, that approach just won't work.  If you trap and kill existing coyotes in a specific area, other coyotes will move into the area, and the remaining coyotes will breed faster.  The secret to keeping coyotes far away from people is robustly hazing any coyote you see.  But don't just trust me.  Do your own research.  You can start by checking out the Humane Society's excellent webpage about coyotes and how to effectively manage them.  The other thing you can do is attend one of two workshops, sponsored by Long Beach Animal Care Services that will be held tonight and tomorrownight.  After all, being smart about coyotes protects you, your pets and Mr. Coyote.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Lambe,

Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust 

 

Upcoming Los Cerritos Wetlands Hike Saturday, September 5th.

Blue Heron

 

Helman

With summer winding down it's time to get out and enjoy the outdoors. Join us and our partners, biologists and environmental educators from Tidal Influence on a hike of Los Cerritos WetlandsSaturday, September 5th.

We will likely come across great blue herons who measure up to 4 feet tall, and their wing spans are huge, 5.5 to 6.5 feet. During this 2-mile urban hike, participants will learn about the history of land acquisitions in Los Cerritos Wetlands and check out some interesting marsh habitat. Walk attendees will get a behind-the-scenes look at how wetlands and oil operations co-exist at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHAT: Raptor Ramble of the former Hellman section of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN: Saturday, September 5th, at 8:00 amsharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 9:45 am.

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.There will be signs.  Wear close-toed shoes, and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

RSVP: Email Elizabeth at ejlambe@verizon.net.

For more information or to download a hike flyer visit our website.

 

There are still spots open for our Sunday, September 13thwetlands kayaking trip.

Kayak
 

Kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands is a fun and interesting way to get to know our local wetlands.  You get to check out parts of the wetlands that are normally off-limits to the public.

We still have spots left for our kayak trip on Sunday, September 13th. We meet at the Leeway Sailing Center at 9:00 am and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough, which is a wetlands area still privately owned.

The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California.

Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

So please join us on Sunday on August 13th, for the great adventure of kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands. To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576. You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip.  Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

 

The Alamitos Bay Bridge is being updated.  Let's make sure it is done in a way that is sensitive to Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Alamitos Bay Brifge

Dear Friend of Los Cerritos Wetlands,

The California Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) is proposing to improve the seismically deficient Alamitos Bay Bridge on Pacific Coast Highway in the City of Long Beach. Three scenarios, a No Build Alternative, Bridge Retrofit Alternative, and Bridge Replacement, have been proposed. CALTRANS is initiating studies for this project; so in order to better identify the issues to be addressed, CALTRANS is soliciting comments from other public agencies, private entities and interested individuals.


As with anything, the devil is in the details.  That's why I urge you to attend the CALTRANS public meeting.


What:  Public Scoping/Open House for the

Alamitos Bay Bridge Improvement Project

When:  Wednesday, August 56:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Where:  Best Western Golden Sails Hotel (Emerald Room)

6285 E. Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach, CA 90803

As you likely know, updating of the zoning of SEADIP, which covers the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands, is going on right now.  Accounting and planning for traffic is supposed to be a part of that updating process.  If the Alamitos Bay Bridge capacity to carry traffic is changed in any way, how does that impact the traffic flow in the area and consequently the SEADIP updating process? That is the kind of question that needs to be addressed when reviewing and discussing any bridge retrofitting or changes.

See you on Wednesday, I hope!

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

Long Beach's coyotes are back in the news.

Coyote

California's drought doesn't just impact people but also the native wildlife.  Or at least that is one explanation as to why some people are seeing more coyotes in Long Beach, especially in the neighborhoods and open-space areas adjacent to El Dorado Park.  Coyotes, a smart and adaptable species, are found throughout Southern California and the United States.


 Coyotes and what to do about them seems to be one of those issues that stir up a lot of passionate debate.  On the one hand, there are people outraged that these animals reside within Long Beach. These people usually consider coyotes pests.  On the other hand there are those who marvel at the fact that such an interesting and wily predator manages to survive in such an urban environment.  But love them or hate them, coyotes are here to stay, so wouldn't it be wise to figure out a way to co-exist with them?  Hopefully that will be the conclusion of the special session called by Councilwoman Stacy Mungo at the upcoming August 11th City Council meeting where the issue is expected to be on the agenda. Please make plans to attend that meeting.

 What:  City Council session about urban coyotes.

 When:  August 11th, 2015, at 5:00 PM

Where:  City Council Chambers, 333 W. Ocean Ave., Long Beach, CA  

Why:  To add your voice to the discussion about Long Beach's urban coyotes and how to manage them.

 In the meantime I urge you to educate yourself about how to coexist with urban coyotes; you are going to have to anyway because other solutions don't work.  You can shape the behavior of coyotes by taking away things that attract them (food and shelter) and by repelling them.  For example if you see a coyote in your neighborhood, you should haze it, which means yell at it, stomp your foot at it, blow a loud whistle at it. The combination of no attractants and consistent hazing will help the coyote understand it is not welcome in your neighborhood and that it should stick to the natural areas where coyotes belong.

For tips on how to keep coyotes out of your neighborhood there is a wealth of information on the coyote page of the Humane Society's Website.

 

Upcoming fun events....Audubon field trip, Surfrider chapter meeting/restaurant event and Sierra Club annual potluck/general meeting. You are invited!

LCWLT Watchers

Our friends over at El Dorado Audubon host some great wetlands bird and nature walks in Los Cerritos Wetlands.  The next one is coming up this Saturday.  Details are below:


El Dorado Audubon Field Trip to Los Cerritos Wetlands


 8:00 AM to 10:00AM on Saturday August 8, 2015

Location: Meet at PCH and First St. in Seal Beach, park off pavement and walk in.  Check out El Dorado Audubon's website orfacebook page for further information about their bird walks and more.

Long Beach Surfrider is having a restaurant fundraiser that is also their Chapter General Meeting.

When: Wednesday, August 12, 2015, 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Where:  The Factory Gastrobar, (which is an Ocean Friendly restaurant) located at 4020 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90807

Special performance by songwriter Christine Olive.

For more information send an email to treasurer@lbsurfrider.org or you can find further details on the Long Beach Surfrider website or facebook page.

Another interesting upcoming event is the screening of the award winning documentary The Big Fix,about the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.  The Big Fix is showing at 6PM on Thursday August 13th at the Long Beach Art Theatre.  Click here for more information or to purchase tickets.

Sierra Club Annual Potluck and General Meeting.

On Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015, at 6:30 PM, you are invited to attend Long Beach Sierra Club's Annual Potluck and General Meeting.  You are encouraged to bring your favorite dish and no more than 15 digital photos of a recent trip (if you wish) to share with the group. $5 suggested donation, $1 if you bring food to share. Although some plates, cups, napkins and drinks will be available, please bring your own durable picnicware (plate, cup and utensils) to reduce your impact on the Earth. Sierra Club is always welcoming of guests.  The potluck general meeting will be at Sierra Club's usual meeting location - Environmental Services Bureau, 2929 East Willow, near Temple in Long Beach.  

More information can be found on the Long Beach/Sierra Club website or facebook page.

 

Hope you can attend, learn about, and share your views on the SEADIP update.  It will have a lasting impact on Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Most of Los Cerritos Wetlands is within the SEADIP area.  The zoning for the area is old and needs to be updated, but in a way that protects and enhances wetlands.

Don't forget that there will be a Planning Commission Study Session for the Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan (SEADIP) tomorrow,Thursday, at 5:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers at Long Beach City Hall at 333 W. Ocean Blvd.


We have said it before and are saying it again: we are glad that the zoning for the areas in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands are being updated. The current zoning is so old and out-of-date it does not reflect what we now know about the fragility and importance of wetlands.  Current SEADIP zoning is from the '70s, when things like roads through wetlands, development on wetlands, and industrial construction on the coast seemed reasonable. Thankfully, those days are long gone.


 There is a lot to take into consideration when thinking about the best way to plan for the future of South East Long Beach, but first and foremost must be the protection and stewardship of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Thankfully the community seems to agree, or at least that is my impression after attending the community meetings about the SEADIP update.  But what does the stewardship and protection of Los Cerritos Wetlands mean exactly?  How does one go about ensuring that whatever is planned for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands, protection of wetlands has the highest priority?


 Well we didn't know ourselves exactly, so back in 2013 when the SEADIP updating process was just beginning we commissioned a review from the respected ecological consulting company Tidal Influence.  After doing research and assessing what data was already available to help guide the biological review process, Tidal Influence's Report recommended the following studies and analysis be incorporated into the SEADIP updating process:  Wetlands Habitat Buffer Analysis, specifically in the areas of light, noise, runoff and human use, Wildlife Corridor Analysis, with a focus on bird trajectory and mammal tracking. And lastly, Comprehensive Habitat Quality Assessment. 


 We hope that is all this information is being looked at and considered by the folks running the SEADIP updating process.  As one community member put it, "It would be a loss for our community if Long Beach's iconic big blue herons that fly so gracefully between Los Cerritos Wetlands and Alamitos Bay were no longer able to do so because of too tall buildings."  He is expressing concern about the proposed up-to-7 story structures that will possibly be part of the new SEADIP.  I look forward to having those sorts of concerns being addressed at the Planning Commission's SEADIP Update Study Session.

Check out the City's press release about tomorrow night's meeting and the agenda.  Then make a plan to attend the meeting.  I hope to see you there!

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

Get to know the Marketplace Marsh portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

The amazing Marketplace Marsh, named for the fact that it gets its water from the Marketplace Shopping Center

Come with us onSaturday, June 6th, 2015 for a nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is currently owned by the City of Long Beach.

Our friends atWhole Foods Long Beach are again donating healthy pre-walk snacks to help kick off the nature walk.  Thanks Whole Foods!  So bring your reusable containers with you.  Then head out on an interesting nature walk lead by our partners from Tidal Influence.  You will enjoy getting to know the fascinating plants and animals that depend on our local wetlands.  I guarantee it.

Our hike will begin with a brief orientation to Los Cerritos Wetlands. We will discuss the history of the wetlands and of Marketplace Marsh. We will then walk around on oil roads, walk toward the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land.  Then we will head back to our meeting place, all the while keeping a lookout for Belding's Savannah Sparrows.

Bring binoculars if you have them; we hope to observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

What:   Tour of the Marketplace Marsh section of Los Cerritos Wetlands

When:  Saturday, June 6, 2015, at 8:00AM

Where (and wear):  Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach). Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. 

Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk emailelizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

 

Help restore Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Be a part of this important resource.

Plant a wetlands plant
Our wetlands are on their way to being restored and made more attractive. Thanks to all the hard-working folks who have volunteered their time, tons of trash have been removed from Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Invasive plants and other weeds have also been removed, and new, "habitat friendly" plants are replacing them.  It's fun, it's fulfilling, and it requires no special skills or experience--just enthusiasm and a willingness to learn.  If you have either of those qualities, then we hope you will join us on Saturday June 6thfor habitat restoration volunteer day at Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Your contribution of time and effort is vital to the success of the restoration and is greatly appreciated! 

What:  Volunteer Habitat Restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

When:  Saturday, June 6th, 2015,10:30 am-12:30 pm

Why:  To help grow native salt marsh plants and remove a persistent nonnative plant called Black Mustard that dominates the landscape and damages habitat.

Where:  Meet at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.

To volunteer,wear close-toed shoes, and please bring sunscreen and water. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a T-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific. 

For more information or to RSVP email iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com.

 

Our next kayak trip is this Sunday.  Should be perfect weather.  You should join us.

Kayak

Kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands is a fun and interesting way to get to know our local wetlands.  You get to check out parts of the wetlands that are normally off-limits to the public.

Our next kayak trip is this Sunday, May 17th. We meet at the Leeway Sailing Center at 9:00 am and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough, which is a wetlands area still privately owned.

The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California.  

Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the 

Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

So please join us this Sunday on May 17th, for the great adventure of kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands. To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip.  Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

See you on Sunday, I hope.

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S.  To check out some cool photos of our most recent kayak trip click here.

 

The future of Los Cerritos Wetlands is closely linked to the outcome of the SEADIP updating process.  Hope you can attend this upcoming meeting.

***SEADIP PLANS
 

There will be a Planning Commission Study Session for the Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan (SEADIP) update on Thursday, May 21, 2015, at 5:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers in Long Beach City Hall at 333 W. Ocean Blvd.

 According to the notice released by the Planning Department, "The Study Session will feature a presentation of the community-shaped vision for SEADIP and the conceptual land-use plan, including general locations and types of commercial, residential, industrial, mixed-use, and wetlands uses. The event will also provide an overview of input received at previous community workshops, and discuss the next steps for developing a Specific Plan. No formal action will be taken by the Planning Commission at this meeting."

As the process moves forward, however, there remain important unanswered questions and concerns, at least on my part, that need to be addressed.  If you have been following the SEADIP updating process, you know that allowing much taller buildings is being proposed for the area (up to 7 stories). That is in contradiction to the City's views, spelled out on page 4 of this document which states "that future dense and high-rise development along the City's coastline should be focused in the downtown area along Ocean Boulevard. . . .in order to protect overcrowding and overuse of the more sensitive resource areas in the eastern or down-coast coastal areas of the City while encouraging higher density in the downtown area that is better able to accommodate high volume activity."

 We are told taller structures within SEADIP are necessary so that there will be more view corridors, amenities and usable open space but still allow for the area's land owners to fairly profit from development.  I am waiting for detailed economic data to substantiate that point of view, and so far there hasn't been any, just a broad overview.  And what about the simply implausible idea that the extension of Studebaker Road through Los Cerritos Wetlands should be studied? We who care about the protection and preservation of Los Cerritos Wetlands, as well as those running the update process, know that such an extension would violate coastal protection laws.  We are told it has to be studied as part of the required California Environmental Quality Act review process, but it sure does make me nervous.  It wouldn't be the first time roads have been proposed through fragile open space as a questionable fix for traffic problems.  Speaking of which, if you are going to increase density and height within the SEADIP area, what will that do to the traffic issues at the corner of 2nd and PCH, as well as at nearby intersections?

 Eventually, there will be an official summary, known as an Environmental Impact Report, that will include a set of development alternatives and potential impacts.  In the meantime it is important that all of us go to meetings, like the one above, ask questions, and make sure decision-makers know our views.  Can I count on you to do that? Specifically on Thursday, May 21st?  I hope so.  See you there!

 

People's State of the City, Beach Streets and our fascinating Turtle Trek--so many varied and interesting events are coming up in Long Beach. 

Beach Street
Peoples-state
 
Heron Hike

The People's State of the City will review progress on key issue areas that matter to Long Beach residents, such as: Community Safety, Housing, Local Jobs, Education, Economic Justice, Environmental Health, and Immigrant Rights. It's a great event, one that I attend every year and always enjoy and learn from. I consider access to the natural world, to enjoy and learn about, a human right. How 'bout you?

Beach Streets sounds fun too, don't you think? The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust will have an
information table at the event at Scherer Park. We are hoping our partners and friends from South Bay Wildlife Rehab will join us. If you are planning to attend the Beach Streets stop by our booth and say hello!

Our Heron Hike of Los Cerritos Wetlands is also on Saturday June 6th. This interesting event starts at 8:00AMand wraps up by 10:00AM.  We begin our walk with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss the history of Los Cerritos Wetlands and view Marketplace marsh. We will walk on oil roads towards the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land before we head back to our meeting place, all the while keeping a lookout for Belding's Savannah Sparrows.  We meet in the driveway at the corner of 1st street and PCH in Seal Beach. 

 

Join us on a nature walk of Los Cerritos Wetlands this Saturday, May 2nd.

Helman

Winter is over; the days are definitely getting warmer; it's time to get outside and enjoy our local wetlands. 

Join us as biologists and environmental educators from Tidal Influence, lead us on a wonderful hike of Los Cerritos Wetlands this Saturday, May 2nd. Tia and Alene will be leading us on a tour that will take us to the spot in Los Cerritos Wetlands where native people lived and thrived many years ago.

We will view and discuss the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands while keeping an eye out for local wildlife.  Of special note is the fact that this land provides habitat for the endangered Belding's Savannah Sparrow. Perhaps we will spot one this Saturday.  Hike attendees will also learn about the history of oil extraction and its impact on the wetlands.

WHAT: Raptor Ramble Nature Walk at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN:      Saturday, May 2nd, 2015, at 8:00AM sharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00 am.

WHERE:    Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.

There will be signs. Wear close-toed shoes; and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

For more information or to rsvp, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

To download a hike flyer visit our website.

P.S. To make our nature walk extra special, pre-walk snacks will be provided to walk attendees by our friends over at Whole Foods Long Beach.  Thanks Whole Foods!

 

Would you like to help restore our local wetlands?

Palnting a Wetlands

On the first Saturday of every month, right after our nature walk (like the one described above) you and anyone you know are invited to participate in our community-based restoration program.  You don't need any special skills, just a good attitude and a willingness to donate a little "elbow grease" to improving Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Why don't you give it a try?  It's a fun and easy way to make a difference.

WHAT:   Community-Based Wetlands Restoration

WHEN:   10:30AM to 12:30PMSaturday, May 2nd, 2015

WHERE:  Meet in the driveway/parking area on the corner of 1st Street and Pacific Coast Highway in Seal Beach.

Wear close-toed shoes, and bring a pair of work gloves if you have them.

For further information or to rsvp, emailiwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com.

Did you know that mustard, an invasive plant introduced many years ago in California, is all over Los Cerritos Wetlands, especially in the Hellman portion?  There will likely be mustard planteradication going on this Saturday, and you can be a part of it! This kind of mustard is a bad plant for Los Cerritos Wetlands.  It crowds out fragile native plants and must be removed!

 

We are excited about our upcoming annual meeting.  Please plan to join us.

Member Meeting
 

Our annual member meeting is tomorrow, April 21, 2015. If you are a member, please attend to hear from and vote for the candidates for our Board of Directors. But member or not, you should attend the meeting because it will feature a really interesting speaker, Taylor Parker.

If, over the years you've ever participated in one of our nature hikes or kayak trips, you probably know why we value Taylor Parker so much. A long time friend to our local coastal wetlands, Taylor has made an indelible impact on both the Colorado Lagoon and Los Cerritos Wetlands. Along with his colleagues at the ecological consulting firm Tidal Influence, Taylor has made important contributions in the areas of habitat restoration and environmental education which will be an enduring legacy for generations to come. So we couldn't be more honored to be hosting Taylor for his very last public appearance before he ventures off to his next adventure in conservation-- all the way to New Zealand.

Taylor will be speaking about The Rare Opportunity: The Role of Endangered Species in Conservation, his presentation about Southern California's rare species and how they interact with habitat conservation. The concept of what makes an Endangered Species and the strengths and weaknesses of having them involved in your project will also be discussed. You'll also learn how to get active in various projects, including the Los Cerritos Wetlands Stewardship Program, to try to save rare species nearing oblivion.

We also use the occasion of our annual meeting to execute our Board election for the 2015/16 term of office. You need to be a current member to be eligible to vote*, but anyone can attend the meeting and hear briefly from our reaffirming Board members. If you are not yet a member or believe your membership may have lapsed, we hope you will use this opportunity to consider joining us. Your right to vote in our annual Board elections is an important privilege of membership, but even more so, your membership in the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust allows us to remain vigilant in our efforts to promote and defend Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHAT: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Annual Membership Meeting

WHEN: Tuesday, April 21st, 2015, at 7:00PM

Conservationist Taylor Parker; also candidates for the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Board of Directors

WHERE: Kettering Elementary School

550 Silvera Ave. Long Beach, CA 90803

For more information or to rsvp, contact Elizabeth Lambe at elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

* Recently lapsed members may renew on or before April 21st to restore their voting eligibility in 2015/16 Board election. New members or those lapsed before September 1st, 2014, may join for voting eligibility in the 2016/17 election.

 

A shout out to our wonderful wetlands protection partners.

Genea Delaware of Whole Foods Long Beach Genea Delaware of Whole Foods Long Beach presenting a check from 5% day to Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Board member Ann Denison and to Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Executive Director Elizabeth Lambe.
Patagonia Santa Monica employees Patagonia Santa Monica employees flanked by our partners from Tidal Influence getting ready to set off for Steamshovel Slough, the wateriest portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands

We just love our diverse and interesting community partners. Whole Foods Long Beach was nice

enough to host a 5% day for the Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust. What that means is that on a certain day a non-profit community partner of Whole Foods (In this case, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust) receives 5% of the day's profits. We also got to set up an information table about the value of protecting Los Cerritos Wetlands in the Whole Foods Long Beach store. Our partnership is going so well now Whole Foods Long Beach provides pre-hike snacks at our monthly wetlands nature walks. Thanks Whole Foods, for helping us protect and preserve Los Cerritos Wetlands! Our next nature walk is Saturday, May 2nd.
Hope you can join us.

Another great partner of ours is Patagonia Santa Monica. Not only do they generously fund our wetlands protection work but they also wanted to get a first-hand look at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Well of course when we think of Patagonia we think of outdoor adventure, so we suggested a wetlands kayak trip for the adventuresome folks associated with the Patagonia Santa Monica store. They are a hardy bunch and made it to Long Beach this past Saturday morning for a paddling tour of the Steamshovel Slough portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands led by our partners from Tidal Influence. Everyone had a great time, and we hope we showed the enthusiastic employees of Patagonia how their donation is helping protect one of the most pristine salt marsh areas in Southern California. We offer kayak tours of Steamshovel Slough to our members and supporters also. Our next kayak tour will be Sunday, May 17th at 9:00AM. If you are interested in reserving a spot for that kayak tour or want more information, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

 

The Green Prize Festival is less than a week away.  We will be there.  So should you!

Green Prize Festival
 

The Green Prize Festival is a one-day event highlighting urban farmers, green chefs, live entertainment, artists, green technology, environmental organizations as well as education through workshops, demonstrations and guest speakers. The event will also feature a free bike valet, beer garden, green vendors, food trucks and children's activities.

The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust will have an informational booth at this event so we can share with festival-goers information about the value of protecting Los Cerritos Wetlands, simple things they can do to help, as well as information about our upcoming wetlands nature walks and kayak trips. We hope you will stop by our booth and say hello.

This festival is a really interesting and wonderful event. One that reflects the "green values" that makes Long Beach such a great place to live.

Hope to see you there!

 

We are super-excited about our upcoming annual meeting. We hope you will make plans to join us.

Taylor Parker

Our annual member meeting is coming up on April 21st. It is where our members have the opportunity to vote for the Board of Directors of the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust. It's an important meeting, and we always look for a way to make it a special event for all who attend, whether you are a member or not. This year we are thrilled to announce that our speaker for the evening will be our long-time associate and friend, Taylor Parker. Taylor is one of the founders of Tidal Influence, our indispensable partner company which, among many other things, leads our monthly nature walks. Taylor is moving on to greener pastures, and I mean that both literally and figuratively because his next gig will be in New Zealand. But before he goes, he will be speaking at our our upcoming member meeting on April 21st.

Taylor will be speaking about: The Rare Opportunity: The Role of Endangered Species in Conservation. His talk is a multimedia presentation about Southern California's rare species and how they interact with habitat conservation. The concept of what makes an Endangered Species and the strengths and weaknesses of having them involved in your project will also be discussed. Dwindling biodiversity globally is a serious planetary concern -some say a threshold that we have already crossed- but Taylor will focus on how reversing this trend is not only possible but actually happening right now in our own backyard. You'll also learn how to get involved in various projects, including the Los Cerritos Wetlands Stewardship Program, to try to save rare species nearing oblivion. Our Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Board of Directors election comes first and should not take long. Look for more information about that aspect of our meeting in a future email.

WHAT: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Annual Membership Meeting

WHEN: Tuesday, April 21st , 2015, at 7:00PM

WHO: Conservationist Taylor Parker, also candidates for the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Board of Directors

WHERE: Kettering Elementary School 550 Silvera Ave. Long Beach, CA 90803

For more information or to rsvp, contact Elizabeth Lambe at elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

 

You are invited to kayak Los Cerritos Wetlands with us.

Kayak

Kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands is a fun and interesting way to learn about our local wetlands. You get to check out parts of the wetlands that are normally off-limits to the public.

Our next kayak trip is this Sunday, April 19th. We meet at the Leeway Sailing Center on Ocean Blvd. at 9:00AM and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough, which is a wetlands area still privately owned.

The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California. Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

So please join us on Sunday, April 19th, 2014, for what is probably our final wetlands kayaking trip of the year. To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.. You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip. Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

 

The Aquarium of the Pacific is hosting a meeting you won't want to miss.

Mel Nutter

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust attorney and advisor Mel Nutter was once Chair of the powerful California Coastal Commission.  On Thursday, April 30th, 2015 at 7:00PM he will be discussing how cities and counties work with the Coastal Commission to prepare Local Coastal Programs designed to protect California's coast.

For some background. . .in 1972 voters approved a ballot measure creating a Coastal Commission and directing it to prepare a plan to protect California's coast. Three years later the Commission delivered its plan to the Legislature. The result was the enactment of the California Coastal Act of 1976. The act directs coastal cities and counties, subject to the approval of the Coastal Commission, to prepare Local Coastal Programs designed to protect natural and manmade coastal resources on and near the coast.

Until the Commission approves a local government's program (consisting of a land use plan and implementing zoning ordinances), a development project in the Coastal Zone requires Coastal Commission approval. Many areas along the coast do not have approved programs or have programs that need updating. And that makes for a weaker and more vulnerable California coastline.

For further information or to rsvp, contact the Aquarium of the Pacfic at 562/590-3100 ext.0

or via the Aquarium of the Pacific events webpage.

The Aquarium of the Pacific is located at 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach, 90802.  Mr Nutter will be speaking in the Ocean Theater.

Hope to see you there!

 

This Saturday is a great day to get to know the sea turtles of the San Gabriel River.

Green Sea Turtle

Join us and our partners,

biologists and environmental educators Tia Blair and Alene Spindel of Tidal Influence, on a wonderful hike along the levy of the San Gabriel River, which bisects Los Cerritos Wetlands.  This Saturday, April 4th Tia and Alene will be leading us on a tour of Los Cerritos Wetlands that will take us to the spot along the San Gabriel River where the sea turtles love to hang out.

For part of our tour we will view and discuss the Zedler Marsh eco-system while keeping an eye out for local wildlife. And much of our walk will take us through the Signal Hill Petroleum oil operations, where we will talk about the history of oil extraction and its impact on the wetlands.

We will hike along Calloway marsh, take the PCH bridge over to the western levee and walk past both privately and publicly owned wetlands, where we will get a chance to check out the Pumpkin Patch property.

WHAT:    Turtle Trek at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN:    Saturday, April 4th, at 8:00 am sharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00 am.  Kids are welcome but they must be closely supervised and able to walk for 2 hours without needing to turn back.

WHERE:  Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.  Please wear close-toed shoes; and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

RSVP: Email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

Hope to see you this Saturday!

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S.  After our nature walk wraps up, you are invited to join in and help the community-based restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands. 

Community-based wetland habitat restoration takes place from 10:30 am -12:30 pm the first Saturday of every month, including this Saturday. Meet at the same place we meet for our nature walks.  

Close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a T-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific.  For more information or to rsvp, emailiwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com.

 

Guess whooo is speaking at the upcoming El Dorado Audubon Society meeting.

Snowy Owls Breeding

Our friends over at El Dorado Audubon are hosting a really interesting meeting featuring Denver Holt, an international owl expert and founder and president of theOwl Research Institute.  Mr. Holt will be in Long Beach on April 16th, 2015, to talk about his snowy owl research in Alaska and help us get to know these interesting raptors.  While there are no snowy owls in Los Cerritos Wetlands, there are other kinds of owls-- mostly barn, great horned and sometimes burrowing.

Denver Holt and his important work has been featured in National Geographic, where they report on Mr. Holt's concern about the impact of the increasing interface between snowy owls and human beings as well as his snowy owl tracking program. Snowy owls only breed in one place in the U.S.--Barrow, Alaska--and Denver Holt has been studying them at that location for over 20 years.

Fun fact:  a snowy owl accompanied the J.K Rowling character, Harry Potter through all his adventures.  Makes sense.  They are mystical magical creatures.  Why don't you make plans to get to know them better on April 16th, and invite your favorite Harry Potter fan to join you too!

 

Latest SEADIP Survey

SEADIP PLAN

The City of Long Beach has ready a new SEADIP survey for those of you who have been following the process.  You can locate it and further details about the zoning update process for the SEADIP area byclicking here.  I am personally looking forward to the traffic numbers associated with the different development scenarios presented at the most recent SEADIP Community Advisory Committee meeting. I know those numbers will help inform my views about what has been proposed.

Proposed Land Plan changes for the SEADIP area can be seen below.  Click here for all the latest news about the SEADIP updating process and how to sign up to get emails.

 

Our wetlands nature walk is coming up soon. Whole Foods Long Beach will be there, and you should too.

Whole Foods trail mix

Come with us this Saturday, March 7th for a nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh portion of Los

Check out Marketplace Marsh on Saturday, March 7th. Have some Whole Foods trail mix with us to help kick things off.
Cerritos Wetlands. This is the part currently owned by the City of Long Beach. Whole Foods Long Beach will be there to help kick off the nature walk by offering attendees water and free scoops of trail mix. So bring your reusable containers and cups with you! Why is Whole Foods doing this? Because they want to help us spread the word that they are hosting a 5% day for the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust on Wednesday, March 11th. That means 5% of Whole Foods Long Beach's profits on that day will be donated to our group. So please attend our nature walk this Saturday, enjoy getting to know the interesting plants and animals that depend on our local wetlands, and then plan to shop at Whole Foods on March 11th.

Our hike will begin with a brief orientation to Los Cerritos Wetlands. We will discuss the history of the wetlands and of Marketplace Marsh. We will then walk around on oil roads, walk toward the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land. Then we will head back to our meeting place, all the while keeping a lookout for Belding's Savannah Sparrows.

Bring binoculars if you have them; we hope to observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

What: Tour of the Marketplace Marsh section of Los Cerritos Wetlands

When: Saturday, March 7th, 2015, at 8:00AM

Where (and wear): Meet at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach) Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Check out our flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

 

Monday's meeting featuring energy expert Bill Powers was fascinating.  Below is a recap.

AES power plant
Do we even need the AES power plant?  Bill Powers says no.

Who knew that the topic of California's energy issues and how the AES conversion fits in, would be so interesting?  Sure, I expected to learn a lot from Bill Power's presentation last Monday at our general meeting but wow, he was a really compelling speaker too.  Bill Power's comprehensive and well- sourced PowerPoint presentation about the AES conversion can be found byclicking here.  But if you just want a summary of the major points, here goes:

Bill's Power's take-home message was that the AES power plant (converted or not) is no longer necessary to meet our region's energy needs.  That is because many new gas-fired power plants have been built in the L.A. Basin in recent years, and there is more renewable energy being generated locally in the form of roof-top solar. Plus we are using energy more efficiently. Therefore, even though there continue to be more and more people in California, our demand for energy has remained flat.

Furthermore, California requires that there be an energy reserve of 15% (called a planning reserve margin) ready and available for, as Bill Powers put it, the hottest day of the year.  California is currently at a 35.9% planning reserve margin.  Concurrently Southern California Edison (SCE) is planning to build a major urban transmission upgrade in the Los Angeles area (the Mesa Loop-In project) that would provide more power by itself than the proposed AES power plant

So what gives?  Why would you keep running the AES Alamitos plant?  Well, it just so happens that, once a power plant is approved by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), it provides a guaranteed profit to the energy company that owns them whether they are on-line and running or not. And who funds that guarantee? Ratepayers, to the tune of $5.6 billion.

It is all interesting food for thought and the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is thinking through what its role should be, but being informed is always the first step.  Folks at the meeting asked for information about how they could learn more about the process and maybe participate.  So a couple of things were suggested.  One is to sign up on the California Energy Commission (CEC) website for alerts and notices about the proposed AES conversion.  You can find that link by clicking here.

The other is, you should also ask local and state level representatives at both the Assembly and Senate level to thoroughly review the need for a power plant in this location.

We, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, don't yet have a position on the AES conversion other than that we are glad that once-through cooling, so harmful to marine life, is going away.  But we feel a duty to help to further the community conversation about the issue since whatever happens with AES will impact our local wetlands and community or years to come.

Stay tuned,
Elizabeth Lambe
Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust
 

Join us for a community briefing about the upcoming AES Power Plant conversion.

Bill Powers
Bill Powers is a power plant operations and transmission expert. AES Alamitos
AES Alamitos

Dear Friend of Los Cerritos Wetlands,

Long Beach is home to one of the largest privately owned, natural gas fueled power plants in Southern California, AES Alamitos, which is located on Studebaker Road at Loynes Drive.   A few years ago AES Alamitos was given a mandate to modernize its cooling system to protect marine life.  AES is now beginning the process of demolishing and rebuilding parts of its facility to meet that goal.

The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is pleased that at AES Alamitos, once-through cooling will be eliminated. It is an antiquated technology, now unnecessary, that kills marine life in and around the wetlands, marine life that is vital to a healthy wetlands ecosystem. So we are glad that California is requiring energy companies to convert to smarter and more efficient ways of producing electrical energy. However, as they say about good things as well as bad, "the devil is in the details." AES has submitted plans to the California Energy Commission for a new generating facility at its current Long Beach location. According to the AES website, the facility will become a natural-gas-fired, combined cycle, air-cooled power plant. But what does that mean? We want to know more and thought you would too. 

That's why the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is excited to be hosting as guest speaker Bill Powers, an expert on issues relating to electrical transmission, power plant operations and power plant permitting. Mr. Powers has over 30 years of experience in the fields of power plant operations and environmental engineering. Attend this meeting and you will have the opportunity to hear from Bill Powers and also ask him questions. So I hope you make plans to join us.

What:  Special Guest Speaker Bill Powers, a respected analyst on issues relating to electrical
transmission, power plant operations and permitting. Acclaimed as one of the country's most respected engineers in utility and energy resource management, Mr. Powers has shaped strategy to achieve renewable energy objectives for several leading utilities. 

When:  Monday, March 2, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. 

Where:  Kettering Elementary School, 550 Silvera Avenue, Long Beach

To RSVP or for more information:  Email Elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.orgor call 714-357-8576

The purpose of our meeting is to help you, your neighbors and groups like the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust learn how they can most effectively participate in the AES power plant conversion process. Hope to see you there.

Elizabeth Lambe
Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

 

You are invited on a wetlands nature walk and kayak trip. Both are coming up soon.

Marketplace Marsh
Marketplace Marsh Kayakers enjoying the lovely Steamshovel Slough area 
of Los Cerritos Wetlands
Kayakers enjoying the lovely Steamshovel Slough area of Los Cerritos Wetlands

Come with us on Saturday, March 7, 2015 for a nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh portion of Los

Cerritos Wetlands, which is currently owned by the City of Long Beach.  Whole Foods Long Beach will be there to help kick off the nature walk by offering attendees water and free scoops of trail mix.  So bring your reusable containers and cups with you.  Why is Whole Foods doing this? Because they want to help us spread the word that they are hosting a 5% day for the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust on Wednesday, March 11th.  That means the 5% of Whole Foods Long Beach's profits on that day will be donated to our group.  So attend our nature walkthis Saturday, enjoy getting to know the interesting plants and animals that depend on our local wetlands and then plan to shop at Whole Foods on March 11

Our hike will begin with a brief orientation to Los Cerritos Wetlands. We will discuss the history of the wetlands and of Marketplace Marsh. We will then walk around on oil roads, walk toward the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land.  Then we will head back to our meeting place, all the while keeping a lookout for Belding's Savannah Sparrows.

Bring binoculars if you have them; we hope to observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

What:   Tour of the Marketplace Marsh section of Los Cerritos Wetlands


When:  Saturday, March 7, 2015, at 8:00AM


Where (and wear):   Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach)  Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.  

Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

 

As for kayaking, you don't want to miss out on an opportunity to kayak the lovely and pristine Steamshovel Slough area of Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Since Steamshovel Slough is still privately owned, your best chance to check it out in person is by signing up for one of our kayak trips. Steamshovel Slough is a gem of a spot.  Largely untouched since it was formed, a journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time. 

Our next kayak trip isSunday, March 8, 2015. We meet at the Leeway Sailing Center at 9:00am and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough.

The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California.  Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

So please join us on Sunday, March 8, 2015, for a lovely early spring kayaking trip. To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip. Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

To get a good idea of what it is like to kayak to Steamshovel Slough check out these cool photos of our recent kayak trip.

 

 

 

Attend our meeting featuring acclaimed energy expert Bill Powers.

Bill Powers
Bill Powers is a power plant operations and transmission expert.

Dear Friend of Los Cerritos Wetlands,

I just can't say enough good things about Bill Powers.  I have had the privilege of working with Bill Powers on energy related issues in the past and have always been impressed by what a rare combination of smarts and talent Bill possesses. What do I mean by that?  Well for starters, Bill Powers has great credentials when it comes to the issues of power plant operations and transmission.  But what makes him truly amazing is his ability to communicate his knowledge and expertise in a way that an ordinary person (like me, for example) can understand.

And that is particularly important when the community is trying to understand the complexities of this state and federally required AES power plant conversion.  AES must change away from the environmentally damaging once-through cooling process, but the company plans other changes as well.  We applaud the disappearance of once-through cooling as the changes promise thereturn of marine life to the wetlands, including Alamitos Bay.  However, it is important we, local community members as well as others who care about the protection and preservation of wetlands, really understand the details of this conversion.   We know some things, like the new power plant will likely be "on-line" more often because it will be more efficient to run it that way.  But what will the ramifications of that increased run time be?  Potential air emissions changes, noise and light changes, details about the proposed battery storage on the AES lot all need to be understood. There are lots of things to consider, and Bill Powers is sure to do a great job at helping folks sort it all out.

After all, once the AES  conversion is completed, we will have to live with the results a long time.  Who knows if or when AES will ever be modified or changed again?  So let's make sure we understand all that is involved in the conversion process so that we can do our part to make sure it is done right.

WHAT:   Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Informational Meeting
WHEN:  Monday, March 2nd at 7:00 PM
WHERE: Kettering Elementary School

               550 Silvera St., Long Beach

WHO:     Special Guest Speaker:  Bill Powers, an independent expert and respected analyst on issues relating to electrical transmission and power plant operations.

For more information call 714-357-8576 or email Elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

Hope to see you on Monday, March 2nd! It will be time well spent.  I guarantee it.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

The zoning for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands is being updated. Help make sure it is done right.

SEADIP

Land Use Plans

 

The updating of zoning for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands will have a big impact on the health and welfare of our local wetlands, and here's why: SEADIP (South East Area Development and Improvement Plan) is the zoning plan for the part of Long Beach that contains most of Los Cerritos Wetlands.  SEADIP's current zoning is so old and out-of- date that some developers think it is irrelevant and keep proposing inappropriate developments for the area.

That's why we are happy there is a process underway to update the zoning for the SEADIP area.  It will be a good thing as long as the updated zoning reflects what we now know about the fragility and value of Southern California coastal wetlands.

The next community workshop for the updating process will be this Wednesday, February 11th, at6:30PM and I hope you will attend.  I'll be there hoping to get some clarity about some new and possibly concerning aspects of the planning process that came up at the previous SEADIP Community Advisory Meeting.

I'll be letting City staff and consultants running the meeting know that I still do not understand why they are studying the extension of Studebaker Road through Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Not only would the road extension cause a great deal of harm to our fragile wetlands eco-system, but it would be illegal under the Coastal Act.  We think this information is so important that we commissioned a memo on the issue which we shared with the City.  The response we got back is that it is required under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) that projects in the current SEADIP area must be studied and their impacts measured.  But we remain confused why that requirement seems to apply to the extension of Studebaker Road, which we know would be illegal under the Coastal Act, and not other projects or areas within SEADIP.  Hopefully we will learn more about the City's thinking at the upcoming SEADIP updating workshop.  We urge you to attend.

Please make plans to be a part of this next workshop which will be on  Wednesday, February 11th , 2014, 6:30 pm, at the  Best Western Golden Sails Hotel (Marina Ballroom) located at 6285 E. Pacific Coast Highway.

See you this Wednesday I hope!
Elizabeth Lambe
Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S.  Check out the map below that summarizes potential new height and use proposals for the SEADIP area.  The source of graphics below are from the previous SEADIP Advisory Committee meeting presentation.  That presentation can be found by clicking here.

 

Report from our interesting meeting about the proposed mitigation bank for portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Synergy Oilfield

We were so excited when over a 100 people turned out for our recent meeting about a proposal that could have an enduring and hopefully positive impact on Los Cerritos Wetlands.  It affirms what we have known all along, that more and more people are realizing what a great benefit to the environment and our community a restored and rehabilitated Los Cerritos Wetlands would be. We want to give a big shout out to Synergy CEO John McKeown for coming to our general meeting and laying out his plan (with the help of Glenn Lukos's Thienan Pfeiffer) to create mitigation bank that could bring back to life much of this degraded property and one day move it over into the public trust.  We, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, are intrigued and are looking forward to learning more details as the process moves forward.  We are nothing but appreciative of John McKeown and his team for keeping the public, including us wetlands advocates, informed and in the loop.

If  you missed the meeting but want some details, you can check out the excellent coverage provided by the Signal TribuneLong Beach Press-TelegramGrunion Gazette and LBReport.com.  In factLBReport.com not only reported on the meeting but recorded the meeting and obtained a copy of theslides used in Synergy Oil's presentation.  That's what we call complete coverage!  

 

You are invited to kayak Los Cerritos Wetlands with us.

Kayak

Kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands is a fun and interesting way to get to know our local wetlands. You get to check out parts of the wetlands that are normally off-limits to the public.

Our next kayak trip is Sunday, February 22nd. We meet at theLeeway Sailing Center at 9:00 am and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough, which is a wetlands area still privately owned.

The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California.  Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

So please join us on Sunday, February 22nd, 2014, for a lovely early spring kayaking trip. To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip. Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

To get a good idea of what it is like to kayak to Steamshovel Slough check out these cool photos of our recent kayak trip.

 

Our meeting about a proposed mitigation bank for Steamshovel Slough is coming up soon.

Steamshovel Slough

Steamshovel Slough Map

Dear Friend of Los Cerritos Wetlands,

We hope you are as excited as we are about our upcoming meeting regarding a proposed mitigation bank for Steamshovel Slough and nearby areas.

A land owner has come forward with a plan to create a mitigation bank that would eventually include moving large swaths of his wetlands property over to the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authorityand would also move most of the existing oil infrastructure. These changes could make Los Cerritos Wetlands a more welcoming place for not only fragile plants and animals but for people too.

But mitigation banks can be tricky things and are not without controversy.

That's why we are excited that the originator of this mitigation deal, Synergy Oil & Gas CEO John McKeown, will be our special guest speaker at the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust upcoming general meeting.

We hope you will join us at the meeting to learn more about this intriguing proposal. Not only will you hear from the land owner but also from some of the consultants involved in the project, including Thienan Pfeiffer of Glenn Lukos Associates. Also at the meeting will be Eric Zahn, of Tidal Influence, who has been representing the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust in the early stages of what is likely to be a lengthly process.

WHAT:   Los Cerritos Wetlands Land                     Trust General Meeting

WHEN:  Tues., January 27th at 7:00 PM

WHERE: Kettering Elementary School

550 Silvera St., Long Beach

WHO:     Special Guest Speakers:

John McKeown, CEO, Synergy Oil & Gas

Thienan Pfeiffer, Glenn Lukos Associates

For more information call 714-357-8576 or email Elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

Hope to see you on Tuesday, January 27th! It will be time well spent. I guarantee it.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

Interesting and local conference about wetlands.

ewport Bay Conservancy

Please join the Newport Bay Conservancy on Saturday, January 31, for a Symposium to celebrate World Wetlands Day at The Back Bay Science Center. In this Symposium, attendees will hear from a group of experts who will discuss several of our Southern California coastal wetlands, including their history, ecology, geography, and especially the story of how they acquired various kinds of protected status.

The event runs from 9 AM - 4 PM. You can register through Eventbrite. There is a Symposium fee which varies from $15-25.

Among those speaking will be Professor Travis Longcore, Associate Professor, University of Southern California, speaking on the topic of Historical Wetlands of the Southern California Coast and also Jeff Crooks, Research Coordinator, Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve.

 

Upcoming fun nature walk at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Helman

Our next nature walk is coming up on Saturday, February 7th. It is on the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which will look lovely after all the recent rains.

As part of our walk we will stroll through heritage coastal sage scrub and historic dredge spoils, while looking for raptors (birds of prey) and a number of other species that nest in the area. We will pass salt flats where we may see tiger beetles and coyote tracks before hiking up to the Heron Pointe Cultural Trail to discuss how tidal circulation shapes our local wetlands. Our walk leaders will share their knowledge and passion for the wildlife of the wetlands as we continue along the cultural trail, discuss the native peoples of the area and the history of the Heron Pointe Development.  We will also look for wildlife like the endangered Belding's Savannah Sparrow. 

We will complete our walk by heading back along the access path to the parking area. 

Bring binoculars, if you have them.  We will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

What:   Raptor Ramble nature walk.

When:  Saturday, February 7th, 2015, from 8:00AM until 10:00AM

Where: Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Meet us in the driveway near 1st street and PCH. You may park in the driveway.  

For more information email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576 or download a flyer.

 

A unique approach to protecting Steamshovel Slough, a vital parcel of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Steamshovel Slough
A sunny day at Steamshovel Slough
Photo:  Cindy Crawford
www.caopenspace.org

Steamshovel Slough Map

Dear Friend of Los Cerritos Wetlands,

For years the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust has wanted to move all privately owned portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands into the public trust so that our local wetlands would be more protected from exploitation and development and able to be restored. We have also advocated for the consolidation of oil operations on Los Cerritos Wetlands so that there would be less infrastructure, noise and pollution spread throughout this ecosystem.

The journey to realizing our vision has been long, sometimes contentious and never easy. But we have kept at it, and now close to half of Los Cerritos Wetlands are in the hands of theLos Cerritos Wetlands Authority (LCWA), whose mission is the protection and restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Now there is a new and interesting idea regarding most of the remaining privately owned portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands. A land owner has come forward with a plan to create a mitigation bank that would eventually include moving large swaths of his wetlands property over to the LCWA and would also move most of the existing oil infrastructure. These changes could make Los Cerritos Wetlands a more welcoming place for not only fragile plants and animals but for people too.

Would the proposed mitigation bank enhance public access to Los Cerritos Wetlands as well as protect important natural resources?  We have been told that it will, but we need more information. That's why we are excited that the originator of this mitigation deal, Synergy Oil & Gas CEO John McKeown, will be our special guest speaker at the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust upcoming general meeting.

We hope you will join us at the meeting to learn more about this intriguing proposal.  Not only will you hear from the land owner but also from some of the consultants involved in the project including Thienan Pfeiffer of Glenn Lukos Associates. Also at the meeting will be Eric Zahn, of Tidal Influence, who has been representing the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust in the early stages of what is likely to be a lengthly process.

  • WHAT:  Los Cerritos Wetlands Land                    Trust General Meeting
  • WHEN:  Tues., January 27th at 7:00 PM
  • WHERE: Kettering Elementary School 550 Silvera St., Long Beach
  • WHO:     Special Guest Speakers:

John McKeown, CEO, Synergy Oil & Gas

Thienan Pfeiffer, Glenn Lukos Associates

For more information call 714-357-8576 or email Elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

Hope to see you on Tuesday, January 27th! It will be time well spent. I guarantee it.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

Start the New Year off right by getting to know the sea turtles of the San Gabriel River.

Sea Turtle

Join us and our partners,

biologists and environmental educators Tia Blair and Alene Spindel of Tidal Influence, on a wonderful hike along the levy of the San Gabriel River, which bisects Los Cerritos Wetlands.  ThisSaturday, January 3rd, 2015, Tia and Alene will be leading us on a tour of Los Cerritos Wetlands that will take us to the spot along the San Gabriel River where the sea turtles love to hang out.

For part of our tour we will view and discuss the Zedler marsh eco-system while keeping an eye out for local wildlife. And much of our walk will take us through the Signal Hill Petroleum oil operations, where we will talk about the history of oil extraction and its impact on the wetlands.

We will hike along Calloway marsh, take the PCH bridge over to the western levee and walk past both privately and publicly owned wetlands, where we will get a chance to check out the Pumpkin Patch property.

WHAT:    Turtle Trek at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN:    Saturday, January 3rd, at 8:00 am sharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00 am.  Kids are welcome but they must be closely supervised and able to walk for 2 hours without needing to turn back.

WHERE:  Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.  Please wear close-toed shoes; and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

RSVP:     Email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

 

We will be restoring Los Cerritos Wetlands this Saturday.  Please join in and help!

Restore Los Cerritos Wetlands

After our nature walk wraps up there will be an opportunity to join in and help the community-based restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Community-based wetland habitat restoration takes place from 10:30 am -12:30 pm the first Saturday of every month, including this Saturday, January 3rd.  Participate and you will be doing important things that help restore Los Cerritos Wetlands.  You will have an opportunity to plant in a coastal sage scrub habitat or remove polluting trash from Zedler Marsh.  The restoration meeting place is the same place we meet for our hikes. 

Close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a T-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific.  For more information or to rsvp, email iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com.

 

happy holidays

Dear Friend of Los Cerritos Wetlands,
Our local wetlands give so much to us. They support fragile and endangered plants and animals, protect our coastline, and offer an opportunity for ourselves and our families to spend time in their rich California coastal habitat. We are proud to be your partner as advocates for this important natural resource. In this season of giving and gratitude, we hope you'll consider a few reasons and ways to support the work of the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust.
'Tis the Reasons to Support

the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

  • Because we are vigilant in our defense of local coastal wetlands.
  • Only the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is on the ground working everyday to defend this vulnerable plot of urban nature in Long Beach and Seal Beach, a remnant of a once-vast ecosystem.

  • Because slowly and surely, our wetlands are being brought back to life.
  • In partnership with the wetlands stewardship program, we are participants in an ambitious habitat restoration program to create and rehabilitate invaluable acreage of tidal salt marsh.

  • Because we remain committed to keeping our nature walks accessible to all.
  • Thanks to our monthly guided nature walks, thousands of people have experienced and learned about the wetlands firsthand.

  • Because we help future generations develop an appreciation for the natural world. 
  • Using the wetlands as an outdoor classroom, we are helping a generation of kids to feel connected to and inspired by nature in our school-age education programs.

  • Because we couldn't do it without you!
  • Our ability to preserve, protect, and restore our local wetlands is owed in huge part to members and supporters like you. Thank you for being our partners in this mission!

    'Tis the Ways to Support

    the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

  • Please renew your membership or become a new member today!
  • Your tax deductible annual membership, at whichever level is most comfortable for you, makes a huge difference in our ability to run successful advocacy, outreach, and education programs.

  • Consider a flexible and convenient sustaining gift to the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust.
  • This year we've introduced the flexible option of electronic (credit and debit) donations on recurring cycles such as monthly, quarterly, or semi-annually. Not only is this a secure and convenient option for our members, it allows us even greater vision in our long-term annual planning.

  • Participate in a habitat restoration event.
  • On the first Saturday of every month, immediately following our nature walks, community members gather with trained naturalists to remove harmful and invasive weeds, to plant native plants, and to collect pounds of trash so often carried in from the tides. This makes an enormous impact on the health of the wetlands.

  • Join us at our general meetings, nature walks, and other fun and informative events.
  • Our regular member meetings and monthly walks are fun and interesting opportunities to meet and greet friends of the wetlands, and to learn more about critical issues facing Los Cerritos Wetlands.

  • Brag about Los Cerritos Wetlands!
  • Follow and share our page on Facebook, proudly wear our t-shirts (available for purchase at any of our events and coming soon online), or send a Los Cerritos Wetlands notecard to a friend (free gift to members at the level of $50 and above). Not only do we hope that more and more people will learn about, love, and understand the value of our wetlands, our growing ranks also shows decision makers that Los Cerritos Wetlands matter to the community.

    We hope that you will celebrate the wetlands with us this year, and choose to support the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust. Please join us in our commitment to preserve, protect, and restore our local wetlands today!

    With warm wishes for this holiday season, Elizabeth Lambe, Executive Director and all of us at the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

    Donate

     

    The Humane Society's Lynsey White Dasher, is coming to town to teach coyote hazing workshops. Trust me, you will want to hear what she has to say.

    Lynsey White Dasher
    Lynsey White Dasher, Director, Humane Wildlife Conflict Resolution, The Humane Society of the United States

    Lynsey White Dasher
    Ms. White Dasher educating Long Beach residents about coyotes. photo credit: signaltribunenewspaper.com

    The first time I had the opportunity to hear Lynsey White Dasher was really sort of a coincidence.  A few years ago I heard that the City of Long Beach was hosting someone from the National Humane Society to educate residents about urban coyotes.  At the time I knew very little about urban coyotes and the challenge of managing their interaction with people and their pets.  I had never seen a coyote in my life (they are excellent hiders) not in the wetlands or in my neighborhood.  But what the heck,  I knew there were coyotes living in Los Cerritos Wetlands, and furthermore I wanted to learn more about this complex, social, and highly adaptable animal.

    I was happily surprised to find the meeting room at Long Beach Animal Services jam-packed with people, and in the course of that meeting many attendees shared stories of their interactions with urban coyotes.  However the crowd was not an angry one.  In fact many people spoke of their amazement that such a wild creature was able to survive in our urban environment. More than one person spoke of observing coyotes (always after dark) traveling through the many channels in Long Beach that carry storm-water out to the ocean.  In just a short time, less than two hours actually, thanks to Ms. White Dasher's comprehensive and informative presentation, I gained knowledge and expertise about coyotes that I now use not only to co-exist with urban coyotesbut to shape their behavior.  

    Persuasive, educational, compelling, Lynsey White Dasher is the real deal when it comes to getting yourself educated about urban coyotes.  So please make a plan to attend one of these upcoming

    coyote hazing workshops hosted by the City of Seal Beach.  You will learn important information about coyotes and how to keep them away from people and pets and instead out in the wetlands where they belong. You will gain practical information about how to haze coyotes that I hope you will share with friends, neighbors, and family.  'Cause one thing I can tell you for sure:  no matter how many coyotes you trap and kill, you can't get rid of them. 

    They are too smart and adaptable and are able to reproduce so rapidly that they make the solution of eradication impossible to achieve

    What:      Coyote Hazing Workshops

    When:     Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

    Where:    Seal Beach Marina Community Center

    151 Marina Drive

    Seal Beach,  CA  90740

    2:30p.m. - 4:00p.m.

    North Seal Beach Center

    3333 Saint Cloud Drive 

    Seal Beach,  CA  90720

    6:30p.m. - 8:00p.m.

    Click here for further details about these upcoming coyote hazing workshops plus information about a Leisure-World-residents-only coyote behavior workshop.

    Hope to see you this Tuesday!  It will be time well spent.  I guarantee it.

    Sincerely,

    Elizabeth Lambe

    Executive Director

    Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

     

    Councilwoman Suzie Price is hosting a community meeting about the SEADIP updating process.

    SEADIP

    The City of Long Beach has begun an effort to comprehensively review and update the zoning known as the Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan (SEADIP), an area that encompasses all of Los Cerritos Wetlands that are located within Long Beach. 

    And while we agree that the zoning should be updated, we want it to be done in a way that enhances and protects our local wetlands.  The current zoning for the area is more than twenty-five years old and for sure does not reflect the realities of what we know now about the value and fragility of wetlands.  But the one thing the old zoning did capture was the importance of keeping this area low-rise and un-dense.  It has been on purpose that downtown Long Beach is tall and dense compared to Southeast Long Beach, which is low-rise and open.  Here's hoping the proposed revised zoning for the area reflects that intention.

    According to Suzie Price's office, "This significant undertaking offers a unique opportunity to creatively balance responsible growth with resource preservation, and establish a thoughtful framework to guide strategic changes to this important gateway into our City. We hope you will join in the discussion by attending our November community meeting."   Guest speakers will be Angela Reynolds, Deputy Director of Development Services, and Wendy Grant, Principal with Placeworks Consultants.

     This interesting and informative meeting will be held Wednesday, November 19th at 6:00PM

    at the Gaslamp Restaurant located at 6251 E. Pacific Coast Highway.

    Please RSVP your attendance to julie.maleki@longbeach.gov.

     

    Our nature walk and wetlands kayak trip were at full capacity last month, so reserve your spot now for our upcoming tours.

    Marketplace Marsh

    Come with us on Saturday, December 6th, 2014, on a nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is currently owned by the City of Long Beach.  

    Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss the history of the wetlands and view Marketplace Marsh. We will then walk around on oil roads, walk towards the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land before we head back to our meeting place, all the while keeping a lookout for Belding's Savannah Sparrows.

    Bring binoculars, if you have them; we hope to observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

    What:  Tour of the Marketplace Marsh section of Los Cerritos Wetlands
     
    When:  Saturday, December 6th 2014, at 8:00AM


    Where (and wear):  Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach)  Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. 

    Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

    As for kayaking, you don't want to miss out on an opportunity to kayak the lovely and pristine Steamshovel Slough area of Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Since Steamshovel Slough is still privately owned, your best chance to check it out in person is by signing up for one of our kayak trips. Steamshovel Slough is a gem of a spot.  Largely untouched since it was formed, a journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time.  

    Our next kayaking trip will be on Saturday, January 24th, 2015

    , from 9:00AM until noon. We meet at the Leeway Sailing facility, and it costs $13 per person to cover the kayaks, paddles and life-vests. You need to be able to paddle a couple of miles to and from Steamshovel Slough, but we are never in a hurry and stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine reserve. Minimum age is 16, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  Check out these fun photos from last month's kayak trip lead by our partners, Tidal Influence.

    Everyone on our kayak tour must have a confirmed rsvp which you can obtain by emailing elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call714/357-8576.

     

    The conversation about urban coyotes continues.

    coyote

    Seal Beach's controversial coyote trapping program has now wrapped up, at least for the time being, maybe forever?  It would be interesting to be able to study the results of their program in order to test if coyote trapping made a difference in lessening encounters between coyotes and people and their pets.

    Now the City of Long Beach has put forth their draft coyote management plan which you can view by clicking here.  They are asking for comments, so if you have any, please send them to animalcare@longbeach.gov.

    In the draft plan the City of Long Beach first advises shaping a coyote's behavior by removing attractants and seriously hazing coyotes should you come into contact with one.   But for more aggressive coyotes they too advise "lethal removal".  However, the question remains the same: how will you ever know that you trapped and removed a "problem coyote" and not just a random coyote minding his own business?  Which of course will not solve the problem and may well make it worse.  I have yet to hear an answer to that question.  Coyotes and how to manage them and their behavior is a tricky problem, that is for sure.  It is up to us to help our city leaders find real solutions, not just quick ones that may or may not work. 

    A real solution would be an educated community able to tackle the coyote situation head-on and do something about it.  And on that front I have some good news.  I have been informed that compelling and well-regarded National Humane Society coyote behavior expert Lynsey White Dasher will be in Seal Beach to educate the community about coyotes on December 2nd and 3rd. Ms. Dasher was extremely interesting and knowledgeable when I heard her speak at a coyote behavior seminar hosted by Long Beach Animal Care Services a few years ago. It is great news that Ms. Dasher will be speaking locally.  Stay tuned.  When I receive further details about these upcoming meetings I will share them with you.

     

    Our next kayak trip is this weekend.  It might be our last one for 2014.  You should join us.

    Kayak

    Kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands is a fun and interesting way to get to know our local wetlands.  You get to check out parts of the wetlands that are normally off-limits to the public.

    Our next kayak trip is this Sunday, November 9th.  We meet at the Leeway Sailing Center at9:00 am and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough, which is a wetlands area still privately owned.

    The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California.  

    Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the 

    Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

    So please join us on Sunday, November 9th, 2014, for what is probably our final wetlands kayaking trip of the year.  To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip.  Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

    See you on Sunday, I hope.

    Sincerely,

    Elizabeth Lambe

    Executive Director

    Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

    P.S.  To check out some cool photos of our most recent kayak trip click here.

     

    Remembering Kim Masoner, a local coastal hero

    Kim Masoner

    Kim Masoner, a well-known and well- regarded coastal protection activist, passed away recently, and we want to take a moment to remember Kim and thank her for her work. 

    A Seal Beach resident, Kim personified the words "hands-on activist".  She was the kind of person who, when she saw a problem, would come up with a practical solution to solve it.  Dismayed by all the trash that flowed onto our local beaches, Kim Masoner did something about it and that is co-found the local organization Save Our Beach. Through her non-profit group and with the help of like-minded volunteers, Kim organized beach clean-ups, wetlands clean-ups and participated in public educational events to help people understand the harm trash, especially plastic, inflicts on our beaches and oceans.

    Those who knew Kim best talk about her boundless enthusiasm for making the world a better place and her love of nature, the coast, the ocean, and her local community.   A fun thing to know about Kim is that she enjoyed re-purposing those ubiquitous single-use plastic bags that pollute our waters and land.  She was not only a big fan of recycling plastic bags, but of taking that whole concept one step further andknitting plastic bags into reusable bags.   lt's a cool, fun activity you might want to try too.   

    Maybe you would like to be a hands-on activist yourself.  Our next wetlands restoration day is Saturday, December 6th, 2014, after our wetlands nature walk.  We hope you will join us. Or sign up for one of Save Our Beach's clean-up events.  Their next clean-up is Saturday, November 15th. Because if there is one thing we can learn from someone like Kim Masoner, it is that each one of us can make a difference in the world and that all of us should try.

     

    More SEADIP updating opportunities

    SEADIP

    As you likely know, the City of Long Beach has begun an effort to comprehensively review and update the zoning known as the Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan (SEADIP) for an area covering 1,500 acres of southeast Long Beach.  According to a recent 3rd District newsletter. "This significant undertaking offers a unique opportunity to creatively balance responsible growth with resource preservation and an opportunity to establish a thoughtful framework to guide strategic changes in this important gateway into our City."

    Councilwoman Suzie Price will be holding her next 3rd District Community meeting onWednesday, November 19, 2014, at the Gaslamp Restaurant (6251 East Pacific Coast Highway) at 6:00 PM. to inform the community about the SEADIP updating process and where it now stands.

     

    I urge you to attend this meeting to learn the latest news about the SEADIP updating and what the next steps in the process will be. Guest speakers will be Angela Reynolds, Deputy Director of Development Services and consultant Wendy Grant, Principal with Placeworks

    To RSVP send an email to julie.maleki@longbeach.gov.  

     

    Fight fear with knowledge. Attend our upcoming Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust meeting featuring Professor Tim Revell.

    Killing Doesnt Work

     

    The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is hosting an informational meeting about urban coyotes, what you need to know about them and how best to manage coyotes in an urban setting (hint:  Killing them doesn't work).  Our featured speaker will be Professor Tim Revell, who holds a degree in biology with an emphasis on animal behavioral ecology.  Professor Revell was also a member of the Coyote Committee that Seal Beach put into place.  It was a committee that ignored the advice of an expert.  

    According to Professor Revell, trapping coyotes culls the slow, dumb, ignorant male coyotes, removing them from the population. Thus trapping is the worst thing you can do because, when you trap the weaker animals, it helps create larger packs of smarter, more aggressive coyotes.  

    Come hear for yourself from an expert what to do to make our neighborhoods safe for people, pets and wildlife. Learn about this enigmatic predator and the role coyotes play in our Los Cerritos Wetlands ecosystem.  It will be an interesting and educational evening.

    What: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust informational meeting featuring Professor Tim Revell.

    Why: To learn more about urban coyotes, the role they play in the wetlands eco-system and how to live with them

    Tuesday, October 28th at 7:00PM

    Where: Kettering Elementary School Auditorium

    550 Silvera Avenue

    Long Beach, CA 90803

    For more information or to RSVP, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org. Or call 714/357-8576.

    Elizabeth Lambe

    Executive Director

    Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

    P.S.  Give yourself a little treat and watch this video about the impact of re-introducing wolves into Yellowstone Park.  It is a little lesson in the importance of the overall health of an eco-system.  Our local Los Cerritos Wetlands eco-system will suffer if coyotes are unable to fulfill their role as our top predator.

    Yellowstone

     

     

    Walk in nature with us. Perhaps you will spot an amazing raptor.

    LCWLT OWL

    Come with us on Saturday, November 1st, 2014, on a nature walk of the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is located entirely in Seal Beach.  Thanks in part to nearby Gum Grove Park, we often see interesting birds, including birds of prey.  It's amazing how many of them depend on those tall trees as well a plentiful food supply from the wetlands.  

    What:  Tour of the Seal Beach section of Los Cerritos Wetlands

    When:  Saturday, November 1st, 2014, at8:00AM

    Where (and wear):  Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach)  Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.  

    Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

    And if you like walking on our wetlands you will love helping to restore them.  Which happens right after our wetlands walk.

    Thanks to many hard-working folks who have volunteered their time helping to restore Los Cerritos Wetlands, tons of trash have been removed, invasive plants and other weeds have also been removed, and new, "habitat friendly" plants are replacing them.  Helping to restore our local wetlands is fun and it requires no special skills or experience--just a willingness to learn. If you have either of those qualities, then we hope you will join us this Saturday (after our wetlands walk) for habitat restoration volunteer day at Los Cerritos Wetlands. Your contribution of time and effort is vital to the success of the restoration and is greatly appreciated!

    What: Volunteer Habitat Restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

    When: Saturday, November 1st, 2014,10:30 am-12:30 pm.

    Why: To help grow native salt marsh plants and remove a persistent nonnative plant, called Black Mustard or Brassica nigra, that dominates and damages habitat.

    Where: Meet at Los Cerritos Wetlands at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.

    To volunteer on Saturday, close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a tee-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific.

    For more information or to RSVP email iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com.

     

    The next SEADIP Community Advisory Committee meeting is coming up soon.

    SEADIP

    The next SEADIP (Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan) Community Advisory Committee meeting has been scheduled for Wednesday, October 29 at 6:00 p.m. in the Seafarer Room at the Golden Sails Hotel, located at 6285 E Pacific Coast Highway. 

    According to the City of Long Beach Development Services Department, "The project team will be presenting various prototypes and analyses of alternatives, which we will be comparing to certain criteria, such as the project vision, traffic thresholds, fiscal feasibility, etc.  Your input in this process is very important, and your presence at the meeting is greatly appreciated."

    Community members are welcome, and there is a public comment period at the end of the meeting.

    I'll be there as a member of the Community Advisory Committee and hope you will be too. The future of Los Cerritos Wetlands is inextricably intertwined with the future of the lands surrounding it.

     

    Upcoming coyote meeting and report review hosted by Councilmember Suzie Price.

    paul george Director of Parks George Chapjian will brief lunch attendees about the about the finding's of Long Beach's Urban Wildlife Report.
    professor revell Learn directly from an animal behavior expert about urban coyotes.
     

    The issue of urban coyotes and Seal Beach's decision to trap and kill them sure has been in the news lately. And it seems to have spurred what I hope is healthy discussion in nearby cities and communities. I know a few years back Huntington Beach considered similar coyote trapping and killing tactics but instead chose to emphasize coyote control and public education.


    Now Long Beach is having those same discussions. The Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine has finalized a report regarding the City of Long Beach's urban wildlife policy, which of course includes coyotes, that will be presented at the 3rd District upcoming lunch on October 16th. I urge you to attend the lunch and hear first hand what the City of Long Beach's views are on this emotional topic.

    The guest speaker will be George Chapjian, Director of Parks, Recreation, and Marine, who will provide an Urban Wildlife Report. Additionally Ted Stevens, Manager of the City's Animal Care Services Bureau, and a representative from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife will be joining the discussion

    A copy of that report won't be released until the day of the meeting, but when it becomes available I will share it with you.

    Additionally, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is hosting an informational meeting about urban coyotes, what you need to know about them,and how best to manage them in an urban setting (hint: Killing them doesn't work). Our featured speaker will be Professor Tim Revell, who holds a degree in biology with an emphasis on animal behavioral ecology. Professor Revell was also a member of the Coyote Committee that Seal Beach put into place. It was a committee that did not listen the advice of an expert.

    To quote Professor Revell, "What you end up trapping is the slow, dumb, ignorant male coyotes and remove them from the population. Trapping is the worst thing you can do. When you trap the weaker animals, it helps create larger packs of smarter, more aggressive coyotes."

    Come hear for yourself from an expert, what to do to make our neighborhoods safe for people, pets and wildlife. Learn about this interesting predator and the role it plays in our Los Cerritos Wetlands ecosystem. It will be an interesting and educational evening.


    What: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust informational meeting featuring Professor Tim Revell.

    Why: To learn more about urban coyotes, the role they play in the wetlands eco-system and how to live with them.

    When: Tuesday, October 28th at 7:00PM

    Where: Kettering Elementary School Auditorium
    550 Silvera Avenue
    Long Beach, CA 90803

    For more information or to RSVP, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org. Or call 714/357-8576.

    Elizabeth Lambe
    Executive Director
    Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

    P.S. On Monday, October 13th at 7:00PM the Seal Beach City Council will be receiving a report and update regarding their coyote policy. I urge you to attend and share your views. You can check out the upcoming Seal Beach City Council agenda by clicking here.

     

    Councilmembers Stacy Mungo and Patrick O'Donnell are hosting a meeting about the SEADIP updating process. 

    seadip

    Councilmembers Mungo and O'Donnell are hosting a meeting about the SEADIP updating process. If you haven't had a chance to learn about the updating process and how it will impact not just the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands but also nearby neighborhoods, now is your chance. The zoning for the SEADIP area, which contains all of Los Cerritos Wetlands that are within Long Beach, hasn't been updated in decades, so the updating is long overdue.

    The question is how do you update the zoning for an area without harming wetlands and increasing traffic, yet taking into account landowners' concerns. The devil is in the details, and hopefully more of those details will be availbable to the public on Wednesday, October 15th, 2014.

     

    Our nature walk and wetlands kayak trip were at full capacity last month, so reserve your spot now for our upcoming tours.

    owl-eucalyptus-treeAn owl enjoying the eucalyptus trees of Gum Grove Park.
    Photo: Cindy Crawford. http://www.caopenspace.org
    kayakingA journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time.


    Come with us on Saturday, November 1st, 2014, on a nature walk of the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is located entirely in Seal Beach. Thanks in part to nearby Gum Grove Park, we often
    Gum Grove Park owl at Sunset.

    see interesting birds, including birds of prey. It's amazing how many of them depend on those tall trees as well a plentiful food supply from the wetlands.

    What: Tour of the Seal Beach section of Los Cerritos Wetlands

    When: Saturday, November 1st, 2014, at 8:00AM

    Where (and wear): Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach) Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

    Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

    As for kayaking, you don't want to miss out on an opportunity to kayak the lovely and pristine Steamshovel Slough area of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Since Steamshovel Slough is still privately owned, your best chance to check it out in person is by signing up for one of our kayak trips. Steamshovel Slough is a gem of a spot. Largely untouched since it was formed, a journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time.

    Our upcoming kayak trip will be on Sunday, October 26th, 2014, from 9:00AM until noon. We meet at the Leeway Sailing facility, and it costs $13 per person to cover the kayaks, paddles and life-vests. You need to be able to paddle a couple of miles to and from Steamshovel Slough, but we are never in a hurry and stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine reserve. Minimum age is 16, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Check out these fun photos from last month's kayak trip lead by our partners, Tidal Influence.

    Everyone on our kayak tour must have a confirmed rsvp which you can obtain by emailing elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.