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Raptor Ramble Nature Walk

Upcoming Guided Nature Walk

Turtle Trek

What: Turtle Trek

When: Saturday, January 3rd 2015 from 8:00AM until 10:00AM

Where: Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Meet us in the driveway near 1st street and PCH.  You may park in the driveway.  

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will walk along 2nd street to the bridge and look for sea turtles. For part of our tour we will view and discuss the Zedler marsh eco-system while keeping an eye out for local wildlife. Part of our walk will take us through the Signal Hill Petroleum oil operations where we will talk about the history of oil operations and their impact on the wetlands. We will wrap up our walk by hiking along Calloway marsh, taking the PCH bridge over to the western levee and walking past newly acquired city owned wetlands past the Pumpkin Patch, land swap property and campground marsh.

We will complete our walk by heading back along the access to the parking. Bring binoculars, if you have them, we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

Download a flyer

For more information or to RSVP email ejlambe@verizon.net
or call 714/357-8576.

The Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy works to restore and preserve the few remaining wetland acres in Huntington Beach.
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust aims to purchase and preserve the remaining open space of the Bolsa Chica, one of the last remaining wetland ecosystems in Southern California.

We love South Bay Wildlife Rehab
Rehabilitating wildlife throughout Southern California

The Humane Society's Lynsey White Dasher, is coming to town to teach coyote hazing workshops. Trust me, you will want to hear what she has to say.

Lynsey White Dasher
Lynsey White Dasher, Director, Humane Wildlife Conflict Resolution, The Humane Society of the United States

Lynsey White Dasher
Ms. White Dasher educating Long Beach residents about coyotes. photo credit: signaltribunenewspaper.com

The first time I had the opportunity to hear Lynsey White Dasher was really sort of a coincidence.  A few years ago I heard that the City of Long Beach was hosting someone from the National Humane Society to educate residents about urban coyotes.  At the time I knew very little about urban coyotes and the challenge of managing their interaction with people and their pets.  I had never seen a coyote in my life (they are excellent hiders) not in the wetlands or in my neighborhood.  But what the heck,  I knew there were coyotes living in Los Cerritos Wetlands, and furthermore I wanted to learn more about this complex, social, and highly adaptable animal.

I was happily surprised to find the meeting room at Long Beach Animal Services jam-packed with people, and in the course of that meeting many attendees shared stories of their interactions with urban coyotes.  However the crowd was not an angry one.  In fact many people spoke of their amazement that such a wild creature was able to survive in our urban environment. More than one person spoke of observing coyotes (always after dark) traveling through the many channels in Long Beach that carry storm-water out to the ocean.  In just a short time, less than two hours actually, thanks to Ms. White Dasher's comprehensive and informative presentation, I gained knowledge and expertise about coyotes that I now use not only to co-exist with urban coyotesbut to shape their behavior.  

Persuasive, educational, compelling, Lynsey White Dasher is the real deal when it comes to getting yourself educated about urban coyotes.  So please make a plan to attend one of these upcoming

coyote hazing workshops hosted by the City of Seal Beach.  You will learn important information about coyotes and how to keep them away from people and pets and instead out in the wetlands where they belong. You will gain practical information about how to haze coyotes that I hope you will share with friends, neighbors, and family.  'Cause one thing I can tell you for sure:  no matter how many coyotes you trap and kill, you can't get rid of them. 

They are too smart and adaptable and are able to reproduce so rapidly that they make the solution of eradication impossible to achieve

What:      Coyote Hazing Workshops

When:     Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Where:    Seal Beach Marina Community Center

151 Marina Drive

Seal Beach,  CA  90740

2:30p.m. - 4:00p.m.

North Seal Beach Center

3333 Saint Cloud Drive 

Seal Beach,  CA  90720

6:30p.m. - 8:00p.m.

Click here for further details about these upcoming coyote hazing workshops plus information about a Leisure-World-residents-only coyote behavior workshop.

Hope to see you this Tuesday!  It will be time well spent.  I guarantee it.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

 

Councilwoman Suzie Price is hosting a community meeting about the SEADIP updating process.

SEADIP

The City of Long Beach has begun an effort to comprehensively review and update the zoning known as the Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan (SEADIP), an area that encompasses all of Los Cerritos Wetlands that are located within Long Beach. 

And while we agree that the zoning should be updated, we want it to be done in a way that enhances and protects our local wetlands.  The current zoning for the area is more than twenty-five years old and for sure does not reflect the realities of what we know now about the value and fragility of wetlands.  But the one thing the old zoning did capture was the importance of keeping this area low-rise and un-dense.  It has been on purpose that downtown Long Beach is tall and dense compared to Southeast Long Beach, which is low-rise and open.  Here's hoping the proposed revised zoning for the area reflects that intention.

According to Suzie Price's office, "This significant undertaking offers a unique opportunity to creatively balance responsible growth with resource preservation, and establish a thoughtful framework to guide strategic changes to this important gateway into our City. We hope you will join in the discussion by attending our November community meeting."   Guest speakers will be Angela Reynolds, Deputy Director of Development Services, and Wendy Grant, Principal with Placeworks Consultants.

 This interesting and informative meeting will be held Wednesday, November 19th at 6:00PM

at the Gaslamp Restaurant located at 6251 E. Pacific Coast Highway.

Please RSVP your attendance to julie.maleki@longbeach.gov.

 

Our nature walk and wetlands kayak trip were at full capacity last month, so reserve your spot now for our upcoming tours.

Marketplace Marsh

Come with us on Saturday, December 6th, 2014, on a nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is currently owned by the City of Long Beach.  

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss the history of the wetlands and view Marketplace Marsh. We will then walk around on oil roads, walk towards the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land before we head back to our meeting place, all the while keeping a lookout for Belding's Savannah Sparrows.

Bring binoculars, if you have them; we hope to observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

What:  Tour of the Marketplace Marsh section of Los Cerritos Wetlands
 
When:  Saturday, December 6th 2014, at 8:00AM


Where (and wear):  Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach)  Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. 

Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

As for kayaking, you don't want to miss out on an opportunity to kayak the lovely and pristine Steamshovel Slough area of Los Cerritos Wetlands.  Since Steamshovel Slough is still privately owned, your best chance to check it out in person is by signing up for one of our kayak trips. Steamshovel Slough is a gem of a spot.  Largely untouched since it was formed, a journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time.  

Our next kayaking trip will be on Saturday, January 24th, 2015

, from 9:00AM until noon. We meet at the Leeway Sailing facility, and it costs $13 per person to cover the kayaks, paddles and life-vests. You need to be able to paddle a couple of miles to and from Steamshovel Slough, but we are never in a hurry and stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine reserve. Minimum age is 16, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  Check out these fun photos from last month's kayak trip lead by our partners, Tidal Influence.

Everyone on our kayak tour must have a confirmed rsvp which you can obtain by emailing elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call714/357-8576.

 

The conversation about urban coyotes continues.

coyote

Seal Beach's controversial coyote trapping program has now wrapped up, at least for the time being, maybe forever?  It would be interesting to be able to study the results of their program in order to test if coyote trapping made a difference in lessening encounters between coyotes and people and their pets.

Now the City of Long Beach has put forth their draft coyote management plan which you can view by clicking here.  They are asking for comments, so if you have any, please send them to animalcare@longbeach.gov.

In the draft plan the City of Long Beach first advises shaping a coyote's behavior by removing attractants and seriously hazing coyotes should you come into contact with one.   But for more aggressive coyotes they too advise "lethal removal".  However, the question remains the same: how will you ever know that you trapped and removed a "problem coyote" and not just a random coyote minding his own business?  Which of course will not solve the problem and may well make it worse.  I have yet to hear an answer to that question.  Coyotes and how to manage them and their behavior is a tricky problem, that is for sure.  It is up to us to help our city leaders find real solutions, not just quick ones that may or may not work. 

A real solution would be an educated community able to tackle the coyote situation head-on and do something about it.  And on that front I have some good news.  I have been informed that compelling and well-regarded National Humane Society coyote behavior expert Lynsey White Dasher will be in Seal Beach to educate the community about coyotes on December 2nd and 3rd. Ms. Dasher was extremely interesting and knowledgeable when I heard her speak at a coyote behavior seminar hosted by Long Beach Animal Care Services a few years ago. It is great news that Ms. Dasher will be speaking locally.  Stay tuned.  When I receive further details about these upcoming meetings I will share them with you.

 

Our next kayak trip is this weekend.  It might be our last one for 2014.  You should join us.

Kayak

Kayaking Los Cerritos Wetlands is a fun and interesting way to get to know our local wetlands.  You get to check out parts of the wetlands that are normally off-limits to the public.

Our next kayak trip is this Sunday, November 9th.  We meet at the Leeway Sailing Center at9:00 am and kayak across Alamitos Bay to Steamshovel Slough, which is a wetlands area still privately owned.

The Slough is a remarkable watery area of Los Cerritos Wetlands and is one of the most pristine wetlands in Southern California.  

Just FYI, you have to be in good enough shape to paddle a few miles to Steamshovel Slough and back, but we are never in a rush, and we stop along the way to check out the 

Jack Dunster Marine Reserve.

So please join us on Sunday, November 9th, 2014, for what is probably our final wetlands kayaking trip of the year.  To reserve a spot, send an email to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576You must have a confirmed reservation to join us on this trip.  Cost per person to attend the trip is $13.00 cash, to be paid directly to Leeway to cover the cost of the kayak, paddle and life-vest rental. Minimum age is 16, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

See you on Sunday, I hope.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S.  To check out some cool photos of our most recent kayak trip click here.

 

Remembering Kim Masoner, a local coastal hero

Kim Masoner

Kim Masoner, a well-known and well- regarded coastal protection activist, passed away recently, and we want to take a moment to remember Kim and thank her for her work. 

A Seal Beach resident, Kim personified the words "hands-on activist".  She was the kind of person who, when she saw a problem, would come up with a practical solution to solve it.  Dismayed by all the trash that flowed onto our local beaches, Kim Masoner did something about it and that is co-found the local organization Save Our Beach. Through her non-profit group and with the help of like-minded volunteers, Kim organized beach clean-ups, wetlands clean-ups and participated in public educational events to help people understand the harm trash, especially plastic, inflicts on our beaches and oceans.

Those who knew Kim best talk about her boundless enthusiasm for making the world a better place and her love of nature, the coast, the ocean, and her local community.   A fun thing to know about Kim is that she enjoyed re-purposing those ubiquitous single-use plastic bags that pollute our waters and land.  She was not only a big fan of recycling plastic bags, but of taking that whole concept one step further andknitting plastic bags into reusable bags.   lt's a cool, fun activity you might want to try too.   

Maybe you would like to be a hands-on activist yourself.  Our next wetlands restoration day is Saturday, December 6th, 2014, after our wetlands nature walk.  We hope you will join us. Or sign up for one of Save Our Beach's clean-up events.  Their next clean-up is Saturday, November 15th. Because if there is one thing we can learn from someone like Kim Masoner, it is that each one of us can make a difference in the world and that all of us should try.

 

More SEADIP updating opportunities

SEADIP

As you likely know, the City of Long Beach has begun an effort to comprehensively review and update the zoning known as the Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan (SEADIP) for an area covering 1,500 acres of southeast Long Beach.  According to a recent 3rd District newsletter. "This significant undertaking offers a unique opportunity to creatively balance responsible growth with resource preservation and an opportunity to establish a thoughtful framework to guide strategic changes in this important gateway into our City."

Councilwoman Suzie Price will be holding her next 3rd District Community meeting onWednesday, November 19, 2014, at the Gaslamp Restaurant (6251 East Pacific Coast Highway) at 6:00 PM. to inform the community about the SEADIP updating process and where it now stands.

 

I urge you to attend this meeting to learn the latest news about the SEADIP updating and what the next steps in the process will be. Guest speakers will be Angela Reynolds, Deputy Director of Development Services and consultant Wendy Grant, Principal with Placeworks

To RSVP send an email to julie.maleki@longbeach.gov.  

 

Fight fear with knowledge. Attend our upcoming Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust meeting featuring Professor Tim Revell.

Killing Doesnt Work

 

The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is hosting an informational meeting about urban coyotes, what you need to know about them and how best to manage coyotes in an urban setting (hint:  Killing them doesn't work).  Our featured speaker will be Professor Tim Revell, who holds a degree in biology with an emphasis on animal behavioral ecology.  Professor Revell was also a member of the Coyote Committee that Seal Beach put into place.  It was a committee that ignored the advice of an expert.  

According to Professor Revell, trapping coyotes culls the slow, dumb, ignorant male coyotes, removing them from the population. Thus trapping is the worst thing you can do because, when you trap the weaker animals, it helps create larger packs of smarter, more aggressive coyotes.  

Come hear for yourself from an expert what to do to make our neighborhoods safe for people, pets and wildlife. Learn about this enigmatic predator and the role coyotes play in our Los Cerritos Wetlands ecosystem.  It will be an interesting and educational evening.

What: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust informational meeting featuring Professor Tim Revell.

Why: To learn more about urban coyotes, the role they play in the wetlands eco-system and how to live with them

Tuesday, October 28th at 7:00PM

Where: Kettering Elementary School Auditorium

550 Silvera Avenue

Long Beach, CA 90803

For more information or to RSVP, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org. Or call 714/357-8576.

Elizabeth Lambe

Executive Director

Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S.  Give yourself a little treat and watch this video about the impact of re-introducing wolves into Yellowstone Park.  It is a little lesson in the importance of the overall health of an eco-system.  Our local Los Cerritos Wetlands eco-system will suffer if coyotes are unable to fulfill their role as our top predator.

Yellowstone

 

 

Walk in nature with us. Perhaps you will spot an amazing raptor.

LCWLT OWL

Come with us on Saturday, November 1st, 2014, on a nature walk of the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is located entirely in Seal Beach.  Thanks in part to nearby Gum Grove Park, we often see interesting birds, including birds of prey.  It's amazing how many of them depend on those tall trees as well a plentiful food supply from the wetlands.  

What:  Tour of the Seal Beach section of Los Cerritos Wetlands

When:  Saturday, November 1st, 2014, at8:00AM

Where (and wear):  Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach)  Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.  

Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

And if you like walking on our wetlands you will love helping to restore them.  Which happens right after our wetlands walk.

Thanks to many hard-working folks who have volunteered their time helping to restore Los Cerritos Wetlands, tons of trash have been removed, invasive plants and other weeds have also been removed, and new, "habitat friendly" plants are replacing them.  Helping to restore our local wetlands is fun and it requires no special skills or experience--just a willingness to learn. If you have either of those qualities, then we hope you will join us this Saturday (after our wetlands walk) for habitat restoration volunteer day at Los Cerritos Wetlands. Your contribution of time and effort is vital to the success of the restoration and is greatly appreciated!

What: Volunteer Habitat Restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

When: Saturday, November 1st, 2014,10:30 am-12:30 pm.

Why: To help grow native salt marsh plants and remove a persistent nonnative plant, called Black Mustard or Brassica nigra, that dominates and damages habitat.

Where: Meet at Los Cerritos Wetlands at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach.

To volunteer on Saturday, close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a tee-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific.

For more information or to RSVP email iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com.

 

The next SEADIP Community Advisory Committee meeting is coming up soon.

SEADIP

The next SEADIP (Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan) Community Advisory Committee meeting has been scheduled for Wednesday, October 29 at 6:00 p.m. in the Seafarer Room at the Golden Sails Hotel, located at 6285 E Pacific Coast Highway. 

According to the City of Long Beach Development Services Department, "The project team will be presenting various prototypes and analyses of alternatives, which we will be comparing to certain criteria, such as the project vision, traffic thresholds, fiscal feasibility, etc.  Your input in this process is very important, and your presence at the meeting is greatly appreciated."

Community members are welcome, and there is a public comment period at the end of the meeting.

I'll be there as a member of the Community Advisory Committee and hope you will be too. The future of Los Cerritos Wetlands is inextricably intertwined with the future of the lands surrounding it.

 

Upcoming coyote meeting and report review hosted by Councilmember Suzie Price.

paul george Director of Parks George Chapjian will brief lunch attendees about the about the finding's of Long Beach's Urban Wildlife Report.
professor revell Learn directly from an animal behavior expert about urban coyotes.
 

The issue of urban coyotes and Seal Beach's decision to trap and kill them sure has been in the news lately. And it seems to have spurred what I hope is healthy discussion in nearby cities and communities. I know a few years back Huntington Beach considered similar coyote trapping and killing tactics but instead chose to emphasize coyote control and public education.


Now Long Beach is having those same discussions. The Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine has finalized a report regarding the City of Long Beach's urban wildlife policy, which of course includes coyotes, that will be presented at the 3rd District upcoming lunch on October 16th. I urge you to attend the lunch and hear first hand what the City of Long Beach's views are on this emotional topic.

The guest speaker will be George Chapjian, Director of Parks, Recreation, and Marine, who will provide an Urban Wildlife Report. Additionally Ted Stevens, Manager of the City's Animal Care Services Bureau, and a representative from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife will be joining the discussion

A copy of that report won't be released until the day of the meeting, but when it becomes available I will share it with you.

Additionally, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is hosting an informational meeting about urban coyotes, what you need to know about them,and how best to manage them in an urban setting (hint: Killing them doesn't work). Our featured speaker will be Professor Tim Revell, who holds a degree in biology with an emphasis on animal behavioral ecology. Professor Revell was also a member of the Coyote Committee that Seal Beach put into place. It was a committee that did not listen the advice of an expert.

To quote Professor Revell, "What you end up trapping is the slow, dumb, ignorant male coyotes and remove them from the population. Trapping is the worst thing you can do. When you trap the weaker animals, it helps create larger packs of smarter, more aggressive coyotes."

Come hear for yourself from an expert, what to do to make our neighborhoods safe for people, pets and wildlife. Learn about this interesting predator and the role it plays in our Los Cerritos Wetlands ecosystem. It will be an interesting and educational evening.


What: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust informational meeting featuring Professor Tim Revell.

Why: To learn more about urban coyotes, the role they play in the wetlands eco-system and how to live with them.

When: Tuesday, October 28th at 7:00PM

Where: Kettering Elementary School Auditorium
550 Silvera Avenue
Long Beach, CA 90803

For more information or to RSVP, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org. Or call 714/357-8576.

Elizabeth Lambe
Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S. On Monday, October 13th at 7:00PM the Seal Beach City Council will be receiving a report and update regarding their coyote policy. I urge you to attend and share your views. You can check out the upcoming Seal Beach City Council agenda by clicking here.

 

Councilmembers Stacy Mungo and Patrick O'Donnell are hosting a meeting about the SEADIP updating process. 

seadip

Councilmembers Mungo and O'Donnell are hosting a meeting about the SEADIP updating process. If you haven't had a chance to learn about the updating process and how it will impact not just the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands but also nearby neighborhoods, now is your chance. The zoning for the SEADIP area, which contains all of Los Cerritos Wetlands that are within Long Beach, hasn't been updated in decades, so the updating is long overdue.

The question is how do you update the zoning for an area without harming wetlands and increasing traffic, yet taking into account landowners' concerns. The devil is in the details, and hopefully more of those details will be availbable to the public on Wednesday, October 15th, 2014.

 

Our nature walk and wetlands kayak trip were at full capacity last month, so reserve your spot now for our upcoming tours.

owl-eucalyptus-treeAn owl enjoying the eucalyptus trees of Gum Grove Park.
Photo: Cindy Crawford. http://www.caopenspace.org
kayakingA journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time.


Come with us on Saturday, November 1st, 2014, on a nature walk of the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is located entirely in Seal Beach. Thanks in part to nearby Gum Grove Park, we often
Gum Grove Park owl at Sunset.

see interesting birds, including birds of prey. It's amazing how many of them depend on those tall trees as well a plentiful food supply from the wetlands.

What: Tour of the Seal Beach section of Los Cerritos Wetlands

When: Saturday, November 1st, 2014, at 8:00AM

Where (and wear): Meet at the corner of First Street and PCH in Seal Beach (just over the bridge from Long Beach into Seal Beach) Wear closed-toed shoes; kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Check out this flyer for further information. To RSVP for a spot on this walk email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.

As for kayaking, you don't want to miss out on an opportunity to kayak the lovely and pristine Steamshovel Slough area of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Since Steamshovel Slough is still privately owned, your best chance to check it out in person is by signing up for one of our kayak trips. Steamshovel Slough is a gem of a spot. Largely untouched since it was formed, a journey through Steamshovel Slough by kayak is a trip back in time.

Our upcoming kayak trip will be on Sunday, October 26th, 2014, from 9:00AM until noon. We meet at the Leeway Sailing facility, and it costs $13 per person to cover the kayaks, paddles and life-vests. You need to be able to paddle a couple of miles to and from Steamshovel Slough, but we are never in a hurry and stop along the way to check out the Jack Dunster Marine reserve. Minimum age is 16, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Check out these fun photos from last month's kayak trip lead by our partners, Tidal Influence.

Everyone on our kayak tour must have a confirmed rsvp which you can obtain by emailing elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org or call 714/357-8576.